Pepper

State Dem chair to speak locally

Local Democrats will host their Annual Summer Dinner with speakers State Democratic Chair David Pepper and Kelsey Swindler, candidate for Wilmington City Council. It will be held at 6 p.m. Monday, June 29 in the Moyer Community Room in Wilmington.


Last fall, following an unsuccessful run for Ohio Attorney General, Pepper was unanimously elected State Chair by the State Democratic Executive Committee in Columbus. Clinton County Executive Chair Ann Reno and Charles Watts both serve on the state executive committee.


The dinner will have a social time at 5 p.m. with the dinner at 6 p.m. catered by McCoy’s. Anyone who plans to attendshould call 937-382-4367 or 937-584-5219 no later than June 27 to make a reservation.

 SUPREME COURT UPHOLDS NATIONWIDE HEALTH CARE LAW SUBSIDIES


The Supreme Court on Thursday upheld the nationwide tax subsidies underpinning President Barack Obama's health care overhaul, rejecting a major challenge to the landmark law in a ruling that preserves health insurance for millions of Americans.

The justices said in a 6-3 ruling that the subsidies that 8.7 million people currently receive to make insurance affordable do not depend on where they live, as opponents contended.

The outcome was the second major victory for Obama in politically charged Supreme Court tests of his most significant domestic achievement. And it came the same day the court gave him an unexpected victory by preserving a key tool the administration uses to fight housing bias.

Obama greeted news of the decision by declaring the health care law "is here to stay." He said the law is no longer about politics, but the benefits millions of people are receiving.

Declining to concede, House Speaker John Boehner of Ohio said Republicans, who have voted more than 50 times to undo the law, will "continue our efforts to repeal the law and replace it with patient-centered solutions that meet the needs of seniors, small business owners, and middle-class families."

At the court, Chief Justice John Roberts again voted with his liberal colleagues in support of the law. Roberts also was the key vote to uphold it in 2012. Justice Anthony Kennedy, a dissenter in 2012, was part of the majority on Thursday.

"Congress passed the Affordable Care Act to improve health insurance markets, not to destroy them," Roberts declared in the majority opinion.

Limiting the subsidies only to individuals in states with their own exchanges could well push insurance markets in the other states "into a death spiral," Roberts wrote.

Justice Antonin Scalia, in a dissent he summarized from the bench, strongly disagreed. "We should start calling this law SCOTUScare," he said, using an acronym for the Supreme Court and suggesting his colleagues' ownership by virtue of their twice stepping in to save the law from what he considered worthy challenges.

His comment drew a smile from Roberts, his seatmate and the object of Scala's ire.

Scalia said that Roberts' 2012 decision that upheld the law and his opinion on Thursday "will publish forever the discouraging truth that the Supreme Court of the United States favors some laws over others, and is prepared to do whatever it takes to uphold and assist its favorites."

Justices Samuel Alito and Clarence Thomas joined the dissent, as they did in 2012.

Nationally, 10.2 million people have signed up for health insurance under the Obama health overhaul. That includes the 8.7 million people who are receiving an average subsidy of $272 a month to help pay their insurance premiums.

Of those receiving subsidies, 6.4 million were at risk of losing that aid because they live in states that did not set up their own health insurance exchanges.

The health insurance industry breathed a big sigh of relief, and a national organization representing state regulators from both political parties said the court's decision will mean stable markets for consumers.

"This decision allows (state officials) to move forward with a level of confidence that their markets will not see significant disruption due to a paradigm shift," said Ben Nelson, CEO of the National Association of Insurance Commissioners and a former Democratic senator from Nebraska.

Shares of publicly traded hospital operators including HCA Holdings Inc. and Tenet Healthcare Corp. soared after the ruling relieved those companies of the prospect of having to deal with an influx of uninsured people. Investors had worried that many patients would drop their coverage if they no longer had tax credits to help pay.

The challenge devised by die-hard opponents of the law relied on four words — "established by the state" — in the more than 900-page law.

The law's opponents argued that the vast majority of people who now get help paying for their insurance premiums are ineligible for their federal tax credits. That is because roughly three dozen states opted against creating their own health insurance marketplaces, or exchanges, and instead rely on the federal healthcare.gov to help people find coverage if they don't get insurance through their jobs or the government.

In the challengers' view, the phrase "established by the state" demonstrated that subsidies were to be available only to people in states that set up their own exchanges.

The administration, congressional Democrats and 22 states responded that it would make no sense to construct the law the way its opponents suggested. The idea behind the law's structure was to decrease the number of uninsured. The law prevents insurers from denying coverage because of "pre-existing" health conditions. It requires almost everyone to be insured and provides financial help to consumers who otherwise would spend too much of their paycheck on their premiums.

The point of the last piece, the subsidies, is to keep enough people in the pool of insured to avoid triggering a disastrous decline in enrollment, a growing proportion of less healthy people and premium increases by insurers.

Several portions of the law indicate that consumers can claim tax credits no matter where they live. No member of Congress said that subsidies would be limited, and several states said in a separate brief to the court that they had no inkling they had to set up their own exchange for their residents to get tax credits.

The 2012 case took place in the midst of Obama's re-election campaign, when Obama touted the largest expansion of the social safety net since the advent of Medicare nearly a half-century earlier. But at the time, the benefits of the Affordable Care Act were mostly in the future. Many of its provisions had yet to take effect.

In 2015, the landscape has changed, although the partisan and ideological divisions remain for a law that passed Congress in 2010 with no Republican votes.

The case is King v. Burwell, 14-114. 

Ohio Democratic Party Statement On Supreme Court Decision In King v. Burwell

The Ohio Democratic Party released the following statement on today’s U.S. Supreme Court 6-3 decision in King v. Burwell to uphold Affordable Care Act tax credits for millions of Americans — including more than 160,000 Ohioans.

“Today’s ruling is a huge victory for Ohio families and our state’s health care system,” said Ohio Democratic Party Chair David Pepper. “More than 160,000 Ohioans are receiving a tax credit to help them afford health insurance through the federal marketplace. With today’s ruling, they get to keep affordable insurance — even though Republicans like Rob Portman and John Boehner have cast vote after vote after vote to take away that coverage.

“The facts are that the Affordable Care Act is making a real difference in the lives of so many. A recent Commonwealth Fund study found the vast majority of people who have gained health coverage under the Affordable Care Act are happy with it. Here in Ohio, more than 600,000 have gained Medicaid or CHIP coverage, and the uninsured rate is falling.

“It’s time for the GOP to give up the ghost. The Affordable Care Act is the law of the land — and it is benefiting Ohio families. Today’s ruling is a vindication of what we’ve said all along. We can only hope it marks the end of wasteful efforts by politicians such as Mike DeWine to take away affordable health care from hundreds of thousands of Ohioans.”


Welcome to the Clinton County Democratic Party website!

Welcome to the Clinton County Democratic Party Website.

Our Address:

P.O. Box 734

 Clinton County is located in southwestern Ohio and is represented by legislators in the 86th Ohio House of Representative District, the 17th Ohio Senate District and the 3rd Congressional District.

In 2005, the total number of registered voters in the county's 32 precincts is 24,746.  There are 1,890 Democrats, 6,545 Republicans and 16,311 Independents.

Clinton County Democratic Party Activities:

We hold monthly meetings, mail a monthly newsletter, host Spring and Fall and Christmas Dinners, have a fair booth, work at festivals, walk and ride in parades, hold an annual yard sale and host fund-raisers for Democratic Candidates.  We introduced "Kids Voting" to Clinton County, and we started the program "dems for Kids," in which we donate school supplies twice a year to all elementary schools in Clinton County.

The Clinton County Democratic Party supports and works for Democratic Candidates on the local, state and national level with one of the best GOTV plans in the state of Ohio.

As well as working hard to get democrats elected on both locally and statewide, the Clinton County Democratic Party also participates in numerous community activities

 Community Activities:

 

 

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